Legalize Marijuana

17 10 2010

With a recession, an unemployment rate of 9.5%, and millions of cancer and sick patients, America needs an answer to take away the pain. Legalizing marijuana is one of the solutions to help America get out of its rut. Though there are some moral concerns with the use of marijuana, there are also many benefits to producing and using marijuana. By legalizing marijuana throughout America, the country can:  raise employment rates, slowly come out of the recession, and help save lives.

There is some controversy on whether or not marijuana is addictive. The plain truth is that anything that engages the pleasure receptors can become addictive. Marijuana gives users a sense of a high and euphoria that in some cases becomes addicting. According to an article called Marijuana is Gateway Drug for Two Debates, “More adults are now admitted to treatment centers for primary marijuana and hashish addictions than for primary addictions to heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine, according to the latest government data, a 2007 report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration” (Sarah Kershaw). It seems that more people are becoming addicted to marijuana now more than ever before. The only problem with the statistic is that it does not include one very important piece of information. It does not include that, “57 percent of those admitted for marijuana addiction treatment were ordered to do so by law enforcement” (Sarah Kershaw). Marijuana is illegal. Of course law enforcers will send users to an addiction treatment center. If marijuana was not illegal, fewer cases would be brought to court and therefore fewer people would be sent to treatment centers. If alcohol, tobacco, sex, and a hundred other addicting and pleasure giving things are allowed to be legal, why wouldn’t marijuana be legal?

Though some are against the legalization of marijuana, many believe that it can produce the multiple jobs so America can raise its unemployment rates. If marijuana is legal, the United States government can hire farmers to grow the plants, trucking companies to ship the product, and dispensary owners to sell the product. For centuries there have been users of marijuana, which shows that the product will always be in demand. According to Nick Tennant, the founder of the Med Grow Cannabis College in Michigan, “This state needs jobs, and we think medical marijuana can stimulate the state economy with hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars.” (Tamar Lewin). At the school, students who are of the legal age 21, learn how to legally grow, cook, and sell marijuana. By having students learn how to own their own dispensaries and grow marijuana, this college is just a jumping off point for Americans’ jobs.

http://video.nytimes.com/video/2009/11/28/us/1247465561593/higher-schooling-in-michigan.html

With marijuana farmers and shop owners, America will have multiple people stimulating the economy. By giving more opportunities for jobs, marijuana will give America a great push toward coming out of the recession. The government loses a great deal of money with the amounts of legal fees that the government spends on charging and or imprisoning marijuana users and sellers. In California where marijuana is medically legal, “under the law, SB 1449, possession of up to an ounce of marijuana is punishable by a $100 fine. But offenders would not be arrested or risk having a criminal record” (Jesse McKinley). Instead of inflicting strict laws and wasting money on arresting, the government could just fine those in possession of too much marijuana and make some money. According to Governor Schwarzenegger of California, “In this time of drastic budget cuts, prosecutors, defense attorneys, law enforcement and the courts cannot afford to expend limited resources prosecuting a crime that carries the same punishment as a traffic ticket” (Jesse McKinley). Since there are many budget cuts due to the economy, the legal courts cannot afford to spend money when not necessary. Since the use of marijuana is becoming more socially acceptable, reducing the crime will increase acceptability and reduce great amounts of spending dollars. By reducing spending on legal help and giving a higher employment rate, marijuana is one key component toward a brighter future.

Another way that America can come out of its recession is making itself the number one country for distributing marijuana. America could actually be one of the biggest exports for marijuana. America needs an export now more than ever to restore the economy. Marketers and advertisers would be in demand to help market marijuana products to other countries. According to a quote in The Chatter of The New York Times by Scott Tobias the president of Village Voice Media, which is experiencing revenue increase because of ads for medical marijuana, “This is certainly one of the fastest growing industries we’ve ever seen come in” (pg 42 of the Business Section in the 10/10/10 edition). The advertisement revenue that his company brought in, is just a fraction of what many American companies can make by marketing nationally and internationally. Though marijuana may not be legal in other countries for the time being, America’s legalization would create a ripple affect with many other countries. By becoming the main distributors and marketers of marijuana, the American people can help their country decrease the deficit.

Cannabis not only could save the economy of America, but also the lives of many Americans. For the health of every American, marijuana should be legalized. The doctors in America have found reasons why people should use marijuana. Doctors prescribe marijuana for multiple reasons. They prescribe as a way to relieve pain, and nausea. They also prescribe for loss of appetite in cancer patients when the chemotherapy makes them feel sick. According to an article, “Two cannabinoid prescription drugs are approved for use in this country, but only to treat nausea or appetite loss. And while preliminary research suggests that cannabinoids may help in fighting cancer and reducing spasms in people with multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease, the results have been mixed” (John Leland). According to research, marijuana can be used to cure diseases and helpful with symptoms. Along with those diseases, marijuana can be used to aid with symptoms of cancer and even make getting older a little bit better.

No one enjoys aging. The strains that accompany old age can be harmful and painful for many. With the research that proves marijuana’s medical use, elders are starting to use. According to a professor of geriatric psychology at Duke University, “I think use of medical marijuana in older people is going to be much greater in the future” (John Leland). There are many elders today who are more conservative and less likely to use. However, as the marijuana smoker generations of the 60s and 70s become our elders, the use of cannabis will increase. For many elders, painkillers and antidepressant are used frequently. In one particular case, a 54-year-old man used marijuana to cut down on the amount of painkillers he was taking. The painkillers were making him “feel like a zombie” (John Leland). He was able to reduce the amounts of medical narcotics, OxyContin, and get back living his life. By allowing medical purposes of marijuana, America could help in the aid of the sick and pain rendered.

Marijuana reduces unemployment, stimulates the economy, and cures diseases, and therefore should be legal. There are some risks of marijuana becoming a gateway drug and addictive but there is always a risk with change. However, if the drug is used in moderation and for medical purposes, marijuana can be a great savior. If alcohol and tobacco, which can cause worse damage to the body, are legal then marijuana should also be legal. With the recession and unemployment rate rising, America needs to find a scapegoat. When California fully legalizes marijuana and decreases its debts, America will be able to see how beneficial it can truly be for our economy. If the government wants the economy to improve and American people’s lives to improve, it needs to legalize marijuana. If marijuana is legalized, not only America, but the world will become a better place.

Works Cited

Kershaw, Sarah. “Marijuana Is a Gateway Drug for Two Debates.” The New York Times. 17 July 2009. Web. 10 Oct. 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/fashion/19pot.html?_r=1&ref=marijuana

Leland, John. “Marijuana, Once Divisive, Brings Some Families Closer.” The New York Times [Chicago] 10 Oct. 2010, Sunday ed., National sec.: 14+. New York Times. 9 Oct. 2010. Web. 10 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/10/us/10pot.html&gt;.

Lewin, Tamar. “At This School, It’s Marijuana in Every Class.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 28 Nov. 2009. Web. 07 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/29/education/29marijuana.html&gt;.

McKinley, Jesse. “The New York Times.” Review. The New York Times [Chicago] 02 Oct. 2010, Sunday ed., National sec.: 9. The New York Times. 02 Oct. 2010. Web. 10 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/02/us/politics/02pot.html&gt;.

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Legalize Marijuana Draft

11 10 2010

With a recession, an unemployment rate of 9.5%, and millions of cancer and sick patients, America needs an answer to take away the pain. Legalizing marijuana is one of the solutions to help America get out of its rut. Though there are some moral concerns with the use of marijuana, there are many benefits to producing and using marijuana. By legalizing marijuana throughout America, the country can raise employment rates, slowly come out of the recession, and help save lives.

There is some controversy on whether or not marijuana is addictive. The plain truth is that anything that engages the pleasure receptors can become addictive. Marijuana gives users a sense of a high and euphoria that in some cases becomes addicting. According to an article called Marijuana is Gateway Drug for Two Debates, “More adults are now admitted to treatment centers for primary marijuana and hashish addictions than for primary addictions to heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine, according to the latest government data, a 2007 report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration” (Sarah Kershaw). It seems that more people are becoming addicted to marijuana now more than ever before. The only problem with the statistic is that it does not include one very important piece of information. It does not include that, “57 percent of those admitted for marijuana addiction treatment were ordered to do so by law enforcement” (Sarah Kershaw). Marijuana is illegal. Of course law enforcers will send users to an addiction treatment center. If marijuana were not illegal, fewer cases would be brought to court and therefore fewer people would be sent to treatment centers. If alcohol, tobacco, sex, exercising, and a hundred other addicting and pleasure giving things are allowed to be legal, why wouldn’t marijuana be legal?

By producing the multiple jobs that come with selling marijuana, America can raise its unemployment rates. If marijuana is legal, the United States government can hire farmers to grow the plants, trucking companies to ship the product, and dispensary owners to sell the product. Since there are many users of marijuana, the product will always be in demand. According to Nick Tennant, the founder of the Med Grow Cannabis College in Michigan, “This state needs jobs, and we think medical marijuana can stimulate the state economy with hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars.” (Tamar Lewin). At the school, students learn how to legally grow, cook, and sell marijuana. By having students learn how to own their own dispensaries and grow marijuana, this college is just a jumping off point for Americans’ jobs.

http://video.nytimes.com/video/2009/11/28/us/1247465561593/higher-schooling-in-michigan.html

With marijuana farmers and shop owners, America will have multiple people stimulating the economy. By giving more opportunities for jobs, marijuana will give America a great push toward coming out of the recession. The government loses a great deal of money with the amounts of legal fees that the government spends on charging and or imprisoning marijuana users and sellers. In California where marijuana is medically legal, “under the law, SB 1449, possession of up to an ounce of marijuana is punishable by a $100 fine. But offenders would not be arrested or risk having a criminal record” (Jesse McKinley). Instead of inflicting strict laws and wasting money on arresting, the government could just fine those in possession of too much marijuana and make some money. According to Governor Schwarzenegger of California, “In this time of drastic budget cuts, prosecutors, defense attorneys, law enforcement and the courts cannot afford to expend limited resources prosecuting a crime that carries the same punishment as a traffic ticket” (Jesse McKinley). Since there are many budget cuts due to the economy, the legal courts cannot afford to spend money when not necessary. Since the use of marijuana is becoming more and more socially acceptable, reducing the crime will increase acceptability and reduce great amounts of spending dollars. By reducing spending on legal help and giving a higher employment rate, marijuana is one key component toward a brighter future.

Another way that America can come out of its recession is making itself the number one country for distributing marijuana. America could actually be one of the biggest exports for marijuana. America needs an export now more than ever to restore the economy. Marketers and advertisers would be in demand to help market marijuana products to other countries. According to a quote in The Chatter of The New York Times by Scott Tobias the president of Village Voice Media, which is experiencing revenue increase because of ads for medical marijuana, “This is certainly one of the fastest growing industries we’ve ever seen come in” (pg 42 of the Business Section in the 10/10/10 edition). The advertisement revenue that his company brought in, is just a fraction of what many American companies can make by marketing nationally and internationally. Though marijuana may not be legal in other countries for the time being, America’s legalization would create a ripple affect with many other countries. By becoming the main distributors and marketers of marijuana, the American people can help their country decrease the deficit.

For the health of every American, marijuana should be legalized. The doctors in America have found reasons why people should use marijuana. Doctors prescribe marijuana for multiple reasons. They prescribe as a way to relieve pain, nausea, and loss of appetite in cancer patients when the chemotherapy makes them feel sick. According to an article, “Two cannabinoid prescription drugs are approved for use in this country, but only to treat nausea or appetite loss. And while preliminary research suggests that cannabinoids may help in fighting cancer and reducing spasms in people with multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease, the results have been mixed” (John Leland). According to research, marijuana can be used to cure diseases and helpful with symptoms. Along with those diseases, marijuana can be used to aid with symptoms of cancer and even make getting older a little bit better.

No one enjoys aging. The pains that accompany old age can be harmful and painful for many. With the research that proves marijuana’s medical use, elders are starting to use. According to a professor of geriatric psychology at Duke University, “I think use of medical marijuana in older people is going to be much greater in the future” (John Leland). For many elders, painkillers and antidepressant are used frequently. In one particular case, a 54-year-old man used marijuana to cut down on the amount of painkillers he was taking. The painkillers were making him “feel like a zombie” (John Leland). He was able to reduce the amounts of medical narcotics, OxyContin, and get back living his life. By allowing medical purposes of marijuana, America could help in the aid of the sick and pain rendered.

Marijuana reduces unemployment, stimulates the economy, and cures diseases, and therefore should be legal. There are some risks of marijuana becoming a gateway drug and addictive but there is always a risk with change. However, if the drug is used in moderation and for medical purposes, marijuana can be a great savior. If alcohol and tobacco, which can cause worse damage to the body, are legal then marijuana should also be legal. With the recession and unemployment rate rising, America needs to find a scapegoat. When California fully legalizes marijuana and decreases its debts, America will be able to see how beneficial it can truly be for our economy. If the government wants the economy to improve and American people’s lives to improve, it needs to legalize marijuana. If marijuana is legalized, not only America, but the world will become a better place.

Works Cited

Kershaw, Sarah. “Marijuana Is a Gateway Drug for Two Debates.” The New York Times. 17 July 2009. Web. 10 Oct. 2010. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/19/fashion/19pot.html?_r=1&ref=marijuana

Leland, John. “Marijuana, Once Divisive, Brings Some Families Closer.” The New York Times [Chicago] 10 Oct. 2010, Sunday ed., National sec.: 14+. New York Times. 9 Oct. 2010. Web. 10 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/10/us/10pot.html&gt;.

Lewin, Tamar. “At This School, It’s Marijuana in Every Class.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 28 Nov. 2009. Web. 07 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/29/education/29marijuana.html&gt;.

McKinley, Jesse. “The New York Times.” Review. The New York Times [Chicago] 02 Oct. 2010, Sunday ed., National sec.: 9. The New York Times. 02 Oct. 2010. Web. 10 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/02/us/politics/02pot.html&gt;.





In Arabian Desert, a Visionary City Rises, Walled and Lofty- Final Textual Analysis

9 10 2010

Twenty miles outside the city of Abu Dhabi, is “the world’s first zero-carbon city” (front page). The city, Masdar, is a project designed by a technologically adventurous firm called Foster & Partner. In 2007, when the government first released the information for this project, many viewed it as a gimmick. However, as the project progressed, the citizens of Abu Dhabi came around to the idea. The city is a high-tech little settlement that has a population projection of 90,000 people. Norman Foster, the principle partner, “blended high-tech design and ancient construction practices into an intriguing model for a sustainable community, in a country whose oil money allows it to build almost anything” (front page). Since the United Arab Emirates has great sums of money, the government has been able to pay for the project.

Nicolai Ouroussoff has a few main points about the city Masdar and about its energy solutions. Ouroussoff informs his reader about how the city keeps cool in the extreme heat and how they have solved other energy issues. The two energy issues that needed to be addresses were transportation and the kind of energy used. In a place like Abu Dhabi, the temperature can become as hot as 150 degrees and the builders of the city need to accommodate for those temperatures. In any normal city, the amount of energy to keep quarters livable in that kind of heat would be gigantic.

Ouroussoff explains that one of the most difficult decisions about the city was “what to do with the car” (international pg 12).  The solution was to make a network of electronic cars under the city to minimize fuel intake and take up as little space as possible in the city. One hope for the future is to have a system connect to Abu Dhabi to make the street life livelier. Ouroussoff saw the electric car transit first hand. He describes the experience as being similar to walking onto the set of the movie “2001: A Space Odyssey”. With their pod-shape and LCD touch screens to enter a destination, the cars are depicted as futuristic. Like the cars, every aspect of the city is made to ensure the least amount of energy usage. Ouroussoff uses his memories of the movie so readers can relate to his experience.

Nicolai Ouroussoff explicates how the city is able to remain a carbon free city. The literal city is built in a way to conserve the most energy while keeping the city cool and livable. Masdar is built twenty-three feet above the ground to keep any desert breezes. Since the desert can reach degrees of 150, the streets are made very narrow to minimize sun exposure and increase airflow. Ouroussoff goes on to say another way the city blocks direct sunlight is by the “undulating facade of concrete latticework based on the mashrabiya screens common in the region” (international pg 12). He thinks that by using the latticework, they are able to block the interiors of other buildings. Of the energy being used, “90 percent is expected to be solar, and the rest generated by incinerating waste (which produces far less carbon than piling it up in dumps)” (international pg 12). When depicting the craftsmanship of the city, Ouroussoff uses the word “traditional”. By using this particular word, Ouroussoff is stating that the city is modeled after the United Arab Emirates architecture.

In the article, In Arabian Desert, a Visionary City Rises, Walled and Lofty, Nicolai Ouroussoff seems to target three types of people: those who are fascinated with futuristic towns and places, passionate about the environment like environmentalists, and enthralled with architectural designs like architects. He shares his love of futuristic transportation when he compares the underground electronic cars as being on the set of the “2001: A Space Odyssey”. He targets architects by constantly writing about the specific architectural designs of the buildings. He shows the environmentalists that there is a way to reduce our carbon footprint by following each detail of the town with a way to conserve energy. Any of those three types of people would thoroughly enjoy reading this article because of how much content is targeted toward each type of person.

This article is not just about a city being built in Abu Dhabi, but yet about a hope for the future. By having an entire city powered solely by solar power and incinerated waste, hope is given to those who are worried about humans’ carbon footprints. If one city is able to survive and actually live in luxury without using any kinds of fuel, then every city can find a way to reduce usage of those fuels. This city will be the model that future cities will be based on. This article will be the first documentation of the first ever carbon-free city.

 





Legalize Marijuana Proposal

7 10 2010

With a recession, an unemployment rate of 9.5%, and millions of cancer patients, America needs an answer to solve all of its problems. Legalizing marijuana is one of the solutions to help America get out of its rut. By legalizing marijuana throughout America, the country can raise employment rates, slowly come out of the recession, and help save lives.

By having the multiple jobs that come with producing marijuana, America can raise its unemployment rate. According to Nick Tennant, the founder of the Med Grow Cannabis College in Michigan, “This state needs jobs, and we think medical marijuana can stimulate the state economy with hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars.” (Tamar Lewin). At the school, students learn how to legally grow, cook, and sell marijuana. By having students learn how to own their own dispensaries and grow marijuana, this college is just a jumping off point for Americans jobs.

With marijuana farmers and shop owners, America will have multiple people stimulating the economy. By giving more opportunities for jobs, marijuana will give America a great push toward coming out of the recession. If marijuana is legalized, the government can tax the product as much as they want because of how cheap it is to grow and harvest it. By having great amounts of taxes and giving a higher employment rate, marijuana is one key component toward a brighter future.

For the health of every American, Marijuana should be legalized. Doctors prescribe marijuana as a way to relieve pain, nausea, and loss of appetite in cancer patients when the chemotherapy makes them feel sick. If marijuana can help those who barely have the will to live, how can it not be legal? Marijuana should be legal to help save lives.

Works Cited

Lewin, Tamar. “At This School, It’s Marijuana in Every Class.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. 28 Nov. 2009. Web. 07 Oct. 2010. <http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/29/education/29marijuana.html&gt;.





In Arabian Desert, a Visionary City Rises, Walled and Lofty: Textual Analysis

3 10 2010

Twenty miles outside the city of Abu Dhabi, is “the world’s first zero-carbon city” (front page). The city, Masdar, is a project designed by a technologically adventurous firm called Foster & Partner. In 2007 when the government first released the information for this project, many viewed it as a gimmick. However, as the project progressed, the citizens of Abu Dhabi came around to the idea. The city is a high-tech little settlement that has a population projection of 90,000 people. Norman Foster, the principle partner, “blended high-tech design and ancient construction practices into an intriguing model for a sustainable community, in a country whose oil money allows it to build almost anything” (front page). Since the United Arab Emirates has great sums of money, the government has been able to pay for the project.

Nicolai Ouroussoff has a few main points about the city Masdar and about its energy solutions. Ouroussoff informs his reader about how the city keeps cool in the extreme heat and how they have solved other energy issues. The two energy issues that needed to be addresses were transportation and the kind of energy used. In a place like Abu Dhabi, the temperature can become as hot as 150 degrees and the builders of the city need to accommodate for those temperatures. In any normal city, the amount of energy to keep quarters livable in that kind of heat would be gigantic.

Ouroussoff explains that one of the most difficult decisions about the city was “what to do with the car” (international pg 12).  The solution was to make a network of electronic cars under the city to minimize fuel intake and take up as little space as possible in the city. One hope for the future is to have a system connect to Abu Dhabi to make the street life livelier. Ouroussoff saw the electric car transit first hand. He describes the experience as being similar to walking onto the set of the movie “ 2001: A Space Odyssey”. With their pod-shape and LCD touch screens to enter a destination, the cars are depicted as futuristic. Ouroussoff uses his memories of the movie so readers can relate to his experience. Like the cars, every aspect of the city is made to ensure the least amount of energy usage.

Nicolai Ouroussoff explicates how the city is able to remain a carbon free city. The literal city is built-in a way to conserve the most energy while keeping the city cool and livable. Masdar is built twenty-three feet above the ground to keep any desert breezes. Since the desert can reach degrees of 150, the streets are made very narrow to minimize sun exposure and increase airflow. Ouroussoff goes on to say another way the city blocks direct sunlight is by the “undulating facade of concrete latticework based on the mashrabiya screens common in the region” (international pg 12). He thinks that by using the latticework, they are able to block the interiors of other buildings. Of the energy being used, “90 percent is expected to be solar, and the rest generated by incinerating waste (which produces far less carbon than piling it up in dumps)” (international pg 12). When depicting the craftsmanship of the city, Ouroussoff uses the word “traditional”. By using the word traditional, Ouroussoff  is stating that the city is modeled after the United Arab Emirates architecture.

The intended audience of In Arabian Desert, a Visionary City Rises, Walled and Lofty, is specific to a variety of people. Nicolai Ouroussoff seems to target three types of people: those who are fascinated with futuristic towns and places, passionate about the environment like environmentalists, and enthralled with architectural designs like architects. He shares his love of futuristic transportation when he compares the underground electronic cars as being on the set of the 2001: A Space Odyssey. He targets architects by constantly writing about the specific architectural designs of the buildings. He shows the environmentalists that there is a way to reduce our carbon footprint by following each detail of the town with a way to conserve energy. Any of those three types of people would thoroughly enjoy reading this article because of how much content is targeted toward each type of person.

This article is not just about a city being built-in Abu Dhabi, but yet about a hope for the future. By having an entire city powered solely by solar power and incinerated waste, hope is given to those who are worried about humans’ carbon footprints. If one city is able to survive and actually live in luxury without using any kinds of fuel, then every city can find a way to reduce usage of those fuels. This city will be the model that future cities will be based on. This article will be the first documentation of the first ever carbon-free city.





In Arabian Desert, a Visionary City Rises, Walled and Lofty: Textual Analysis Draft

27 09 2010

Twenty miles outside the city of Abu Dhabi, is “the world’s first zero-carbon city” (front page). The city, Masdar, is a project designed by a technologically adventurous firm called Foster & Partner. In 2007 when the government first released the information for this project, many viewed it as a gimmick. However, as the project progressed, the citizens of Abu Dhabi came around to the idea. The city is a high-tech little settlement that has a population projection of 90,000 people. Norman Foster, the principle partner, “blended high-tech design and ancient construction practices into an intriguing model for a sustainable community, in a country whose oil money allows it to build almost anything” (front page). Since the United Arab Emirates has great sums of money, the government has been able to pay for the project. The only flaw with having the government pay for the project is that they decide who will be able to live in the high-tech city.

Nicolai Ouroussoff has a few main points about the city Masdar. He goes into detail about how the city will use the least amount of energy possible. In a place like Abu Dhabi, the temperature can become as hot as 150 degrees and the builders of the city need to accommodate for those temperatures. In any normal city, the amount of energy to keep quarters livable in that kind of heat would be gigantic. Ouroussoff explains how the city keeps cool in the extreme heat and how they have solved other energy issues like transportation and the kind of energy used.

Ouroussoff explains that one of the most difficult decisions about the city was “what to do with the car” (international pg 12).  The solution was to make a network of electronic cars under the city to minimize fuel intake and take up as little space as possible in the city. One hope for the future is to have a system connect to Abu Dhabi to make the street life livelier. Ouroussoff saw the electric car transit first hand. He describes the experience as being similar to walking onto the set of the movie “ 2001: A Space Odyssey”. With their pod-shape and LCD touch screens to enter a destination, the cars are depicted as futuristic. Like the cars, every aspect of the city is made to ensure the least amount of energy usage.

Ouroussoff explicates how the city is able to remain a carbon free city. The literal city is built-in a way to conserve the most energy while keeping the city cool and livable. Masdar is built twenty-three feet above the ground to keep any desert breezes. Since the desert can reach degrees of 150, the streets are very narrow to minimize sun exposure and increase airflow. Ouroussoff goes on to say another way the city blocks direct sunlight is by the “undulating facade of concrete latticework based on the mashrabiya screens common in the region” (international pg 12). By using the latticework, they are able to block the interiors of other buildings. Of the energy being used, “90 percent is expected to be solar, and the rest generated by incinerating waste (which produces far less carbon than piling it up in dumps)” (international pg 12). All of the energy-saving aspects are very important to make the city what Foster & Partners want it to become.

The intended audience of In Arabian Desert, a Visionary City Rises, Walled and Lofty, is specific to a variety of people. Nicolai Ouroussoff seems to target three types of people: those who are fascinated with futuristic towns and places, passionate about the environment like environmentalists, and enthralled with architectural designs like architects. He shares his love of futuristic transportation when he compares the underground electronic cars as being on the set of the 2001: A Space Odyssey. He targets architects by constantly writing about the specific architectural designs of the buildings. He shows the environmentalists that there is a way to reduce our carbon footprint by following each detail of the town with a way to conserve energy. Any of those three types of people would thoroughly enjoy reading this article because of how much content is targeted toward each person.

The article is not just about a city being built-in Abu Dhabi, but yet about a hope for the future. By having an entire city powered solely by solar power and incinerated waste, hope is given to those who are worried about our carbon footprints. If one city is able to survive and actually live in luxury without using any kinds of fuel, then every city can find a way to reduce usage of those fuels. This city will be the model that future cities will be based on. This article will be the documentation of the first ever carbon-free city.





Rhetorical Precis 2

21 09 2010

Cowen, Tyler. “Can the Fed Offer a Reason to Cheer?” The New York Times [Chicago] 19 Sept. 2010, Sunday ed., Business sec.: 5. Print.

Tyler Cowen insists that the Fed should raise inflation by three percent to “reflate the economy”. He makes his argument by using Ben S. Bernanke’s idea of inflation to show that he is not alone in his thoughts. Cowen wants the economy to raise inflation in order to stimulate the economy and get out of the recession. Tyler Cowen assumes his audience is filled with democrats who have been greatly affected by the financial crisis and who are looking for a fast way to get out of it.